GRAD Greetings!

GRAD Greetings!

Welcome to the first of our two Great Expectations issues; the chosen novel for the theme of this year’s 25th annual Riverside Dickens Festival, the weekend of February 23-25. Great Expectations is the most rare and scarce of any of…

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Tales From The Victorian Crypt IV

Tales from the Victorian Crypt IV

The Old West will come back to life—more or less—-during the fourth annual Tales from the Victorian Crypt event in Riverside’s Evergreen Memorial Historic Cemetery, at the corner of 14th Street and Pine, on October 13 & 14, 2017.  The vault…

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Request For Volunteers!

Request for Volunteers!

Do you have talents or skills you’d like to share with us? The Riverside Dickens Festival has openings on several committees. We are an all-volunteer nonprofit organization and we need your help. The 2018 festival on February 24 and 25,…

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Dance Classes Continue!

Dance Classes Continue!

Dance Classes Continue! Start now to prepare for Mr. Fezziwig’s Ball First and Third Sundays 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Goeske Center 5257 Sierra Street (Near Sears on Streeter) Riverside, CA $5 per class Classes focus on a variety of…

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American Notes, Chapter XVIII: Concluding Remarks

Dickens on American Journalism

“Schools may be erected, East, West, North, and South; pupils be taught, and masters reared, by scores upon scores of thousands, colleges may thrive, churches may be crammed, temperance may be diffused, and advancing knowledge in all other forms walk through the land with giant strides: but while the newspaper press of America is in, or near, its present abject state, high moral improvement in that country is hopeless.  Year by year, it must and will go back; year by year, the tone of public feeling must sink lower down; year by year, the Congress and the Senate must become of less account before all decent men; and year by year, the memory of the Great Fathers of the Revolution must be outraged more and more, in the bad life of their degenerate child.

Among the herd of journals which are published in the State, there are some, the reader scarcely need be told, of character and credit. . . . To those who are accustomed to the leading English journals, or to the reapectable journals of the Continent of Europe, to those who are accustomed to anything else in print and paper, it would be impossible, without an amount of extract for which I have neither space nor inclination, to convey an adequate idea of this frightful engine in America.  But if any man desire confirmation of my statement on this head, let him repair to any place in this city of London, where scattered numbers of these publications are to be found: and there, let him form his own opinion.”

— Charles Dickens

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